Tag: System Center 2016

Enabling SCOM 2016 Agent Proxy

Not too much has changed when it comes to SCOM 2012R2 and SCOM 2016. This post is a similar post to SCOM 2012R2, but applicable to SCOM 2016. (See that post here).

You could go to the computer that SCOM is complaining about and manually enable the agent proxy via Administration > Managed Computers, and modifying its properties, see below:

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Or…… you could make your life easier, and do this…

The fix is easy, and the explanation are both below:

To resolve the “Agent proxy not enabled” alert for all machines in your current environment, run the following PowerShell code in the SCOM PowerShell Console:

get-SCOMagent | where {$_.ProxyingEnabled -match "False"} | Enable-SCOMAgentProxy

To prevent this alert in the future, run the following below:

add-pssnapin "Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.OperationsManager.Client"; new-managementGroupConnection -ConnectionString:<strong>yourSCOMMGMTserverFQDNhere</strong>; set-location "OperationsManagerMonitoring::"; Set-DefaultSetting -Name HealthService\ProxyingEnabled -Value True

 

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Step-by-Step – Upgrading to SCOM 2016 from SCOM 2012 R2

So you’ve decided to take the jump and upgrade to System Center Operations Manager 2016? Assuming you are running a SCOM 2012R2 (UR11) environment, this post will be exactly what you need to have a successful SCOM 2012 R2 to SCOM 2016 upgrade. **Although the recommended path is to upgrade from UR9**

In my environment, here is the quick breakdown:

  • SCOM 2012 R2 environment has two Management Servers.
    • Handful of clients (Windows 2012R2) being monitored.
  • Both Management Servers live on a Windows 2012 R2 operating system.
    • Both Management Servers are running with UR 11 (Update Rollup) **Microsoft recommends upgrading the environment at latest version number minus one (latest – 1), so in this case, UR9 (UR10 was never issued for SCOM 2012R2)**.
  • The SQL environment is a SQL Server 2014 SP2 also running on Windows 2012 R2.
    • The Operations and Data Warehouse live on dedicated SQL instances, however reside on the same server.

Pre-Upgrade Tasks

Let’s get started!

First, we need to do some “Pre-Upgrade” Tasks. Follow these in order.

  1. Back up the Operations Manager Databases
  2. Review the Operations Manager Event Logs
  3. Cleanup the Database (ETL Table)
  4. Remove Agents from Pending Management
  5. Disable the Notification Subscriptions
  6. Stop the Services or Disable any Connectors
  7. Verify that the Operational Database Has More Than 50 Percent Free Space
  8. Back up the Operations Manager Databases

To Cleanup the ETL Tables, you will need to run the following script:

  • The following script will determine the number of rows that will (need) be deleted:

DECLARE @SubscriptionWatermark bigint = 0;

SELECT @SubscriptionWatermark = dbo.fn_GetEntityChangeLogGroomingWatermark();

Select COUNT (*)
FROM EntityTransactionLog ETL with(nolock)
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM EntityChangeLog ECL with(nolock) WHERE ECL.EntityTransactionLogId = ETL.EntityTransactionLogId)
AND NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM RelatedEntityChangeLog RECL with(nolock) WHERE RECL.EntityTransactionLogId = ETL.EntityTransactionLogId)
AND EntityTransactionLogId < @SubscriptionWatermark;

etl-cleanup-1

  • Now we can go ahead and clean up the ETL table running the script below:

DECLARE @RowCount int = 1;
DECLARE @BatchSize int = 100000;
DECLARE @SubscriptionWatermark bigint = 0;
DECLARE @LastErr int;

SELECT @SubscriptionWatermark = dbo.fn_GetEntityChangeLogGroomingWatermark();
WHILE(@RowCount > 0)
BEGIN
DELETE TOP (@BatchSize) ETL
FROM EntityTransactionLog ETL
WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM EntityChangeLog ECL WHERE ECL.EntityTransactionLogId = ETL.EntityTransactionLogId)
AND NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM RelatedEntityChangeLog RECL WHERE RECL.EntityTransactionLogId = ETL.EntityTransactionLogId)
AND ETL.EntityTransactionLogId < @SubscriptionWatermark;

SELECT @LastErr = @@ERROR, @RowCount = @@ROWCOUNT;

END

etl-cleanup-2

Great! Let this run, which may take a few minutes, or hours depending on your environment..

Now we are ready to get started with the upgrade. (Don’t get to backup your databases (Report Server, Operations, Data Warehouse!!)

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Upgrading to SCOM 2016

After you have downloaded the RTM image file, as you may have noticed, it is not an ISO file. So let’s extract the file contents locally…

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Before moving on with the install, I stopped the following SCOM services on all of the Management Servers:

  1. Microsoft Monitoring Agent (healthservice)
  2. System Center Data Access Service (OMSDK)
  3. System Center Management Configuration (cshost)

Now we can run the installer (Run As Administrator or, SCOM Data Access/SDK account)

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Sweet! Although this was expected, since no new changes were required for Windows Server 2012 R2.

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I cannot stress how useful it is to use dedicated service accounts. Here input your Data Access/SDK account.

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Once quick review before we begin the Upgrade..

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Let this run… For me, the upgrade took around 50 minutes for the first Management Server..

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Sweet! All good. Remember to install the license key before the 120 days are up.

Let’s launch the console just to make sure we are in all working order.

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Great! Now we will need to repeat the process for the second/other Management servers…

Once complete, let’s upgrade our client agents to SCOM 2016 (v 8.0.10918.0)

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At this time we can make use of the SCOM 2016 features, and update our out-dated Management Packs. Remember this feature really only works for Microsoft based Management Packs, ie. SQL, Windows Server, Client OS, etc.

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I hope this helped! For additional information, and or upgrading other items such as Gateways, ACS (Audit Collection Services), etc. Please visit Microsoft’s guides HERE.

 

Lastly, it is highly recommended to upgrade to SCOM 2016 Update Rollup 1 (UR1). For that guide, please visit this LINK.

 

Happy SCOM’ing 2016!

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SCOM 2016 Web Console Face-Off

I had some free time so, I figured let’s test out the SCOM 2016 Web Console with respect to HTML5…

In my test, I tested the following browsers. Please note, metrics/data collected was within the built-in browser development tools.

  • Internet Explorer 11 (Obviously)
  • Chrome (v 54.0.2840.71 m)
  • Firefox (v 49.0.2)

I tested out the following views within each browser:

  • Alerts View
  • State Views
  • Performance Views
  • Diagram Views
  • Dashboard Views

Let’s get started:


First, let’s try my default (go-to) browser, Chrome

Alerts View:

alerts

State View:

state

Performance View:

performance

Diagram View:

diagram

Dashboard View:

dashboard

Verdict: Well, that’s a bummer… All but the dashboard view worked. I suspect Silverlight is still required… But good to know most, or at least in this exercise 80% of the functionality tested works in Chrome.

 


Next, let’s test Firefox.

Alerts View:

alerts

State View:

state

Performance View:

performance

Diagram View:

diagram

Dashboard View:

dashboard

Verdict: (See Chrome…)


 

Lastly, Internet Explorer (not Edge).

Alerts View:

alerts

State View:

state

Performance View:

performance

Diagram View:

diagram

Dashboard View:

dashboard

Verdict: Well, there you have it, the SCOM 2016 Web Console is not all HTML5, as it still requires Silverlight. Maybe the MOM team will step their game up, and have this fully integrated in SP1 or maybe R2 versions — After all, HTML5 was released in 2014. Or maybe, this is Microsoft’s gentle way of pushing users to OMS (Operations Management Suite).

Also, Google Chrome was notably faster than Firefox and IE.

OpsMgr Page View; Browser Google Chrome Firefox Internet Explorer (11)
Alerts View 1.84 s 2.73 s 2.73 s
States View 2.62 s 2.13 s 2.12 s
Performance Views 2.88 s 4.68 s 5.50 s
Diagram Views 0.87 s 2.97 s 1.76 s
Dashboard Views 1.96 s 1.40 s 2.18 s

 

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New Features in SCOM 2016 – Maintenance Schedules

One very common request I always get with my SCOM 2012 customers is, “how can I put machines into Maintenance Mode for a future date?”

My response is, well, with some PowerShell and the Windows Task Scheduler, you can achieve this.  But wait, looks like the System Center/SCOM 2016 team has listened and delivered! Introducing ‘Maintenance Schedules‘.

Now SCOM administrators can put a machine, or a group of machines, or a group into Maintenance Mode (MM) for a future date. Even better, it looks like a lot (if not all) of the functionality has been taken from good old Windows Task Scheduler. What that means is, you can put machines into MM, for that Friday night/Saturday morning Change Request, or even better MM for reoccurring schedule, like Patch Tuesday.

In the example below, I am going to do a quick walk-through for a group of machines for a typical patching schedule.


For this scenario, let’s assume the following:

  1. Machines are patched every 3rd Friday of the month,
  2. Blackout/maintenance window is 6 hours (360 minutes),
  3. Scheduled MM will start @11:00PM.

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  • Right click either on Maintenance Schedules, or within the middle pane.

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  • As a rule of thumb, always a good idea to select the second (default) option here, “selected objects and all their contained objects.

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  • Search for the machine(s) or the group(s) you want to enter into Maintenance Mode

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  • Once you’re happy, go ahead and hit next

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  • Next we are presented with an array of options. As per our example, we will be putting our machines in MM every 3rd Friday of the month, starting at 11:00PM, for 6 hours.

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  • Now we’re ready

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  • Now we need to provide a name to our MM Schedule… By default, ‘Planned’ and ‘Enable Schedule’ are ticked off. Go ahead and hit finish!

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  • Now we can see our new Scheduled Maintenance Mode schedule! 🙂

As you can see here, for a SCOM Administrator, you can see which user create this task and also to see if it is enabled at the current time

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  • You can also Edit, Copy, or Disable the schedule. Looks like I just discovered a bug! Also, disabling is not provided here, but it is within the Action pane:

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  • And that is it!

If the schedule was done correctly, you will see the Event ID 1215 within the SCOM Management Server.

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I hope this helped!

Happy SCOM’ing 2016!!

New Features in SCOM 2016 – Management Packs:Updates & Recommendations

One of the many questions I always ask my customers, “how often do you update your Management Packs?”

Some of the typical responses I get are…

  • Ummm..
  • How do you do that?
  • Where can I get the latest MPs from?
  • Oh, I didn’t know they need to be updated…

Well, Microsoft/System Center/SCOM team has listened and delivered!

In SCOM 2016 you can now simply go into the Management Packs administration, and see if there are any updates pending for any of the Management Packs within your environment. Simply right click and download and install the latest version. Note, this feature is currently only applicable to Microsoft based Management Packs. Third party Management Packs you will still have to download and install manually, and also research if there is an updated version. Who knows, this could change by the time SCOM 2016 RTM, or SP1 or even R2 comes out… Until then, only Microsoft MPs.

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Cheers!

Installing & Configuring SCOM 2016 Reporting Feature

Some prerequisites and things to know… In my environment I am using SCOM 2016 (Technical Preview 5 (TP5)) and SQL 2014 SP1 running on Windows Server 2012 R2. On this local server (I am installing this on my SCOM SQL server) I have already deployed a default (not named) SQL instance, with Reporting Services (SSRS) installed (and already configured). If you run into issues here, please let me know.

On your local server, ensure your SQL service account and SQL SSRS account have local administrative rights on the server. Launch the SCOM 2016 installer and run as the SCOM SDK (Data Access) account.

So let’s begin:

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5678

Let this run for a few minutes, grab a coffee, get some fresh air, etc. 🙂

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Yay, no errors!

You should now have the Reporting function within you SCOM 2016 console. Happy (SCOM) reporting!