Tag: DR

Step-by-Step – Deploying Azure Site Recovery (ASR) OVF Template (VMware On-Premises)

In the following tutorial, I will go through a step-by-step walk-through on deploying the Azure Site Recovery (ASR) VMware OVF template. This OVF template is a critical step as it bridges the connection between your On-Premises datacenter and the Azure Site Recovery Vault. Obviously there are a handful of prerequisites, as we need to prepare our VMware environment in addition, prepare our Azure workspace. I have created similar posts for Hyper-V and Azure to Azure (A2A) ASR Migrations, please visit the following link for the detailed setups of the Azure Recovery Services Vault HERE.

Let’s begin…  The first step is to download and install the VMware OVF template. The VMware OVF template can be found at the Microsoft Download Center.

Next, we need to deploy the OVF template within vCenter.

Note, this template will consuming about 1.5TB of space. This is a result of Microsoft consolidating the Configuration server and Process server into one workload.

Once the template is deployed, start the appliance and let’s begin registering our vCenter with ASR vault.

Note, the licence provided with OVF template is an evaluation licence valid for 180 days. You as the customer need to activate the windows with a procured licence.

Now we need to provide the server with some local administrative credentials.

Once you have given it some credentials, the server will auto login. The ASR wizard should launch on its own, if not, you can launch it manually — the icon should be on the desktop.

Once the ASR wizard starts, we will now need to complete the setup for this server following by registering the server with ASR.

Give the server some name, ie. VMwareASR01

Next, we need to validate the server can go over the Internet, ie. Azure and communicate as needed. If you are using a proxy, here is the time to set that up.

One thing to note, having the proxy settings configured within Internet Explorer should be removed.

Once an Internet connection has been established, we can then sign into the Azure Portal.

Now we need to sign into Azure with some credentials, ideally with a privileged/Global Administrator account.

Once you have logged into Azure successfully, you will need to reboot the server.

Once the server is back online, the next steps is to configure the Configuration server. 🙂 This step we will register this server/vCenter appliance with our Recovery Services vault. Let’s begin!

The server will auto-launch the ASR wizard, if not, launch it from the desktop icon.

Now that we have established an internet connection, we can configure our Network Interface Card(s) (NICs). Note, you can add as many as NICs needed, however, this needs to be done at the vSphere level. Once the server has been configured, you cannot add and/or remove those NICs. So, make sure you have it configured exactly as you need it. In my case, we will only need one, so, we will configure the NIC here.

Next, we need to sign into our Azure account, and select the corresponding subscription, resource group and select the appropriate recovery services vault. All of these should be available, and should have been created well before we began configure this server, as per the prerequisites…

Next, our server will download, install and configure MySQL on the server, along with the vSphere PowerCLI tools.

Gotcha, here, the appliance did not provide the vSphere PowerCLI tools, so we had to manually download, and install it.

Once we downloaded VMware’s vSphere PowerCLI toolset, we were able to continue. As mentioned, this was not provided, although it should have been. If we continued forward, the wizard would have thrown an error at the end of validation.

Next, we need to now provide the credentials and information with regards to our vCenter server(s).

Please read the prerequisites with regards to the needed permissions to allow our ASR Configuration server to communicate with the vCenter server(s).

Next we need to provide Windows and Linux based credentials to deploy install the ASR Mobility Service to all machines that will need to be replicated to Azure.

For this exercise, we are not replicating Linux machines to Azure, however if we were, similar to the Windows Mobility Service, we would need to provide some credentials that have elevated access to each of the Linux machines.

Once we have provided all the information above, we should now be able to validate some of the settings we have provided, and register our server with Azure and the Recovery Services vault. Give this a few minutes, as it took about 5 minutes to establish the communication/trust.

Once the registration of the server is complete, and the ASR appliance is officially configured with our Azure Recovery Services vault, we should now be able to see the vCenter/Configuration Server within our Azure Recovery Services vault.

If we click on the server, we can get some additional information, such as the server’s health, configuration, heartbeat, and so on…

We can also now click on the Process Server and get some additional information as well.

Now we are able to select the VMs we want to begin replicating to Azure and start testing failovers, either real, or simulated.

I hope this was helpful! Thanks, and until next time…

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What is Azure File Sync (AFS) and how to set it up?

Earlier this month, Microsoft introduced Azure File Sync (AFS). So, what is Azure File Sync (AFS)?

Azure File Sync is a cloud based backup solution for backing up and providing disaster recovery options for a single, or multiple file shares within a server, or multiple servers. Some of the benefits are:

  • Eliminates network and storage complexity and capacity planning, as it is done for you in Azure.
  • Changes to on-premises data are synchronized in real time to Azure, and file/folder backup is completely seamless to the end-user(s).
  • At the current time, AFS offers 120 days of data retention.
    • I suspect this will increase over time, and will allow administrators to have options with higher or lesser days of retention.

Setting up and configuring Azure File Sync is pretty quick. Below is how I setup Azure File Sync to sync a folder/files from my local server to Azure. AFS is pretty cool stuff, and I have been wanting to chat about it for some time (NDA). At any rate, getting AFS setup is pretty easy. Microsoft provides pretty good documentation on how to do this as well, but in my opinion, they have elected to omit some steps. Here is my take:

First you will need to create a new Azure File Sync Storage Sync. Within the Azure marketplace, search, “Azure File Sync“. Note, Azure File Sync is currently only available to a limited set of regions:

  • South East Asia
  • Australia East
  • West Europe
  • West US

Once created, under Sync, and getting started, download the Storage Sync Agent.

Note, Azure File Sync currently only works with Windows Server 2016 and Windows Server 2012 R2 (servers must be installed with a GUI — no core).

Download and install the agent on your local server, and configure it to the Storage Sync Service you just created in Azure.

Whoops, since this a brand new server install, there is no AzureRM PowerShell modules installed. Go ahead and launch PowerShell as an Administrator, and execute the cmdlet, “Install-Module AzureRM -force

Okay, back to the install. Remember to select the Storage Sync Service you just created in Azure

Once the install is complete, go back to Azure, and under Sync, Registered Servers, your local server should now be present.

Great, now we need to create a Storage account. We can either chose an existing storage account, or create a new one – I chose the ladder.

Regardless with route you take with the Storage account, go into the Storage account properties, and scroll down to File Service, and select Files.

Create a File Share, give it some name, and some quota. I gave it 1GB, as this is simply for testing and PoC. The file path is the same file path you want to backup to AFS. This file path should already exist on your local server(s).

Now go back to your Azure File Sync, and under Sync, and Sync Groups, create a new Sync Group. Within the Azure File Share, select the File Share we just created within our Storage account.

Finally, now we can create an server endpoint. Go back to your Sync Groups, and create a new server endpoint. Here you will need to specify the file/folder you will want to share/copy/backup to your Azure File Sync (AFS).

And that is it! Next I will show you how you can actually restore from your Azure File Sync.

Step-by-Step: Setup and Configure Azure Site Recovery (ASR) with Windows Server 2016 Hyper-V using ARM

Not too long ago, Microsoft announced the support of Windows 2016 and Azure Site Recovery (ASR). Microsoft’s announcement can be found HERE.

With that said, I decided to setup ASR with my Hyper-V 2016 environment. Rather than the typical blog posts (screenshots etc.,) I decided to create a step-by-step video that demonstrates how to setup ASR with Windows Server 2016 and Hyper-V. That video can be found HERE at Channel 9.

In addition this post is a series of blog posts for Azure Site Recovery (ASR).