Category: System Center

Installing System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) 2016 Step by Step (Technical Preview 5)

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR INSTALLING SCOM 2016 [RTM] ON WINDOWS SERVER 2016 WITH SQL SERVER 2016, GO HERE.


This post I will be installing System Center Operations Manager 2016 (SCOM) –  Technical Preview 5 (TP5). Technical Preview for both System Center 2016 and Windows Server 2016 was recently released, April 27th.

Here is some of the background information. As this post will concentrate on the installation of SCOM 2016 TP5, I am going to omit the setup and configuration of the Domain Controller, Windows Server 2012R2 for both SCOM Management Server and SQL Server (Please note, I am using SQL Server 2014 SP1, both servers on Windows 2012R2).

Environment:  Virtual; ESX 5.5 Hypervisor

SCOM Management Server:

  • Windows Server 2012 R2 — SCOM2016TP5
  • 4 vCPU (2.00GHz)
  • 12 GB memory
  • 100GB Diskspace
  • 1GB vNIC

SQL Server:

  • Windows Server 2012 R2 — SCOMSQLTP5
  • SQL Server 2014 SP1
  • 4 vCPU (2.00GHz)
  • 12 GB memory
  • 200GB Diskspace
  • 1GB vNIC

Service Accounts:

Domain\Account Description
RAVILOCAL\scom_aa SCOM Action Account
RAVILOCAL\scom_da SCOM Data Access/SDK Account
RAVILOCAL\scom_sql_read SCOM SQL Reader
RAVILOCAL\scom_sql_write SCOM SQL Writer
RAVILOCAL\scom_admin SCOM Administrators Group
RAVILOCAL\sql_sa SQL Service Account
RAVILOCAL\sql_ssrs SQL Service Reporting Services Account

 

Let’s begin:

1

2

I will not be installing Reporting on this server, as I will install this on the SQL Server (I will create a post for this later…)

3

Well, looks like I will need to install the Report Viewer Controls and need to install some IIS components for the Web Console.

  • For the Reports Viewer Controls prerequisites, you can visit the following post for the instructions, HERE.
  • For the Web Console/IIS components prerequisites,  you can visit the following post for the instructions, HERE.

4

Looks like I still need to meet a few more prerequisites…

5

You will need to apply the following commands (unfortunately I could not execute in PowerShell, so you will need to use Command Prompt (as Administrator)).

  1. cd %WINDIR%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\
  2. aspnet_regiis.exe -r
  3. IISRESET
  4. Reboot your server…

Back to to installation…..

6

7

8

9

Since this is a lab, I installed the databases on the same SQL instance. Best practice, use dedicated instances or better yet, dedicated servers…

10

11

12

13

Whoops, I forgot to add the SCOM service accounts as local administrators on the SCOM Management Server….

14

Okay, back to the installation…

15

16

I recommend always keeping this off, and manually updating your SCOM infrastructure.

17

18

Let this run, go for a break, coffee, smoke, whatever….

20

Yay! All good!

22

23

24

Right off the bat, looks like there are a new features, like, “Tune Management Packs” I will get into this in another post…

 

ThoughtsAs you may have noticed, the install is almost identical to the 2012R2 and it appears not much has changed in terms of the install.

 

(more…)

SCOM 2012 SP1 to SCOM 2012R2 Upgrade Prerequisites

When upgrading from SCOM 2012 SP1 to 2012R2, you will need to install the following prerequisites:

  1. MICROSOFT® REPORT VIEWER 2012 RUNTIME
  2. Microsoft System CLR Types for SQL Server 2012

Of course you can also download them straight from Microsoft. The links are provided below.

SCOM 2016 Technical Preview 5 (TP5)

SCOM 2016 (RTM) along with the System Center 2016 suite and Window Server 2016 are only months away from release. Microsoft just released System Center and Server 2016 TP5 today. Check out the LINK for more information. I will be setting up monitoring with SCOM 2016 TP5 and Server 2016TP5 in the next few days, so feel free to check back in.

Cheers!

SCOM 2012R2 – Set-SCOMLicense : Requested registry access is not allowed Error

So you are trying to apply the SCOM 2012R2 Product Licence with the Operations Manager Shell and getting the following error, “Set-SCOMLicense : Requested registry access is not allowed.”

Error

Try launching PowerShell (as Administrator), importing the OperationsManager Module, and trying it again.

Solution

Don’t forget, in order for the Product Key to be applied, you will need to restart all SCOM Services:

  • Microsoft Monitoring Agent (healthservice)
  • System Center Data Access Service (OMSDK)
  • System Center Management Configuration (cshost)

 

Cheers!

Creating a Converged Network Fabric with SCVMM 2012R2

This blog post should have been posted quite some time ago, however, after numerous revisions and the details in the post, you’ll understand why.

In this post I will demonstrate creating a converged network fabric in SCVMM 2012R2. This converged network will consist of logical network adapters, QoS, NIC (vNIC) teaming, and network adapters.

Step 1, Understand your infrastructure

To begin, my environment is using a Cisco UCS (B200 M4) back end, with Cisco Nexus 9K switches and of course Hyper-V (Windows 2012R2) as its hypervisor. The UCS profile used here, has been provisioned with 7 vNICs and dedicated VLANs for each vNIC to isolate the traffic between the networks. The 7 vNICs for the following jobs (see below). All vNICS have a 10GB interface.

  1. iSCSI-A (traffic to the SAN controller 1)
  2. iSCSI-B (traffic to the SAN controller 2)
  3. CSV-Heartbeat
  4. Live Migration
  5. Management
  6. Server-A (VM Production traffic)
  7. Server-B (VM Production traffic)

Server-A and Server-B vNICs we will team, but we will get into that later.

Step 2, we need understand what all these vNICs are intended for. The logical networks below illustrate the purpose of each network.

  1. SAN/Storage (1) (iSCSI-A) – This network will be for access storage via iSCSI on SAN controller 1. In this environment, we will have two VLANs for redundancy, thus two iSCSI networks.
  2. SAN/Storage (2) (iSCSI-B) – see above. This network will be for access storage via iSCSI on SAN controller 2.
  3. Live Migration – This network will be communication between the hypervisors to transfer VM memory, states, etc.
  4. CSV/Heartbeat – This network will be used by the cluster to communicate a healthy (online) state of the environment.
  5. Management – This network will be used to manage the Hyper-V/hypervisors. SCVMM will make use of this network to communicate to the Hyper-V nodes.
  6. VM Traffic (Server-A + Server-B) – This network will be intended communication for VMs and VMs only. This will be not only a redundant network, but a teamed network to allow additional I/O throughout. As mentioned, all vNICs are on a 10GB interface, teaming these two vNICs/networks will allow I/O to operate at 20GB/s.

Please refer to Microsoft article further details, HERE.

Step 3, SCVMM – Create Logical Network(s)

Within SCVMM, you will now need to create your logical networks within the Fabric pane. As mentioned, I am using VLANs to isolate my traffic. I am also planning to have 15 VM network environments with each having its own dedicated VLAN, VLAN 101 through 116, ie. 10.47.101-116.x. Likewise, dedicated VLANs for iSCSI, Live Migration, etc.

1

Here you need to specify the IP subnet and VLAN ID, and apply it to your Host(s) group.

2

3

Step 4, SCVMM – Create IP Pool(s)

Once you create all of your logical networks, you can now create IP Pools. IP Pools will allow you to manage your logical network, and ensure there are no duplicate IPs consumed. You can also reserve IPs for VIPs, etc. In the screenshot below, as you can see, within my “Production” VM network traffic, my IP range states at 10.47.101.100/24 and ends at 10.47.101.252. This allows 155 IPs to be used. If the IP Pool is soon to be exhausted, this setting configuration can be changed to increase the scope. But for now, I know 155 IPs is more than enough.

By right-clicking on the Logical Network you just created, select “Create IP Pool“.

4

You will need to bound the IP Pool to the Logical Network.

5

Choose, “Use an existing network site” and ensure the right network site and IP subnet populated.

6

Here, I am defining a range of IPs for my Pool. Although I know 155 IPs are more than enough, and will never need all 254 IPs, I am comfortable with the range starting at 100.

7

As you can see here, I have also specified the Gateway and provided 2 DNS servers for the IP Pool. When a new VM will be created, all of the IP Properties will be pulled from here and populated once the VM has been built.

8

At the end of all this, your Logical Network Fabric could look something like this, with your Logical Networks and IP Pools per network.

1

Step 5, SCVMM – Create VM Networks + IP Pools

Within the VMs and Services pane, we will now need to create VM networks. This will be assoicated to our Logical Networks we just created. Within the creation process, we will need to specify the Logical network bound to this VM network. Here I created IP Pools again. I find this process of IP Pools a bit odd/redundant. I have IP Pools in both the Logical Network and the VM Network.

9 10

2

Step 6, SCVMM – Creating Uplink Port Profile

Now we need to create the Uplink Port Profile for our VM Production Traffic. Unfortunately with SCVMM 2012 R2 UR8, SCVMM does not come with a default Uplink port profile, so we must create one. Microsoft best practice indicates using a Dynamic and Switch Independent for the Hyper-V workload.

3

Now we will need to bound all the networks we previous created to the Uplink Port Profile. Here VMM will tell the hypervisors how they are connected and mapped to the network fabric. iSCSI traffic, Live Migration, VM Production, CSV-Heartbeat, etc.

4

 

5

Step 7, SCVMM – Create Logical Switch

Now we will create the logical switch, or also known as a vSwitch. The logical switch is the last part of the fabric puzzle. This logical switch will contain the Uplink Port Profile along with the Virtual port profiles (if we chose to manage QoS via SCVMM).

Within the Logical Switches – Fabric, we will create a new Logical switch. In my scenario, I have not made use of SR-IOV (Single Root – Input Output Virtualization).

6

We will use the default Microsoft Windows Filtering Platform for our vSwitch extension.

7

Here will will specify the uplink port profile(s) that will be associated to the logical switch.  We will Team the mode, and add our Production Uplink/Network sites.

8

We will need to specify the port classifications for each virtual port for the logical switch. Here you can see we are using three classes, high, medium and low bandwidth. 9

Step 8, SCVMM – Assign Logical Switch to Hypervisor

Finally, we now need to assign the logical switch to our hypervisor(s). Navigate to (each) the host group within the fabric work-space and within each hypervisors properties, navigate to the Virtual Switches. Select “New Virtual Switch“. Here we will specify which (in our case only 1) Uplink port profile to use on the physical adapter. Since my two vNICs will be teamed, I will have two (2) adapters bound to the same Uplink port profile.

10

 

Now you are ready to start building machines, making use of your network fabric, and maximizing System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2012R2’s  power.

 

If you have any questions, please drop me a line, and/or need some guidance.

 

Cheers!

SCVMM 2012R2 – Error 25100 – Unable to Delete Logical Network

SCVMM 2012R2 – Error 25100 – VMM is Unable to delete the logical network

This error will occur when you are trying to delete a logical network which still has resources bound to it.

After creating some virtual machines that were bound to this logical network, I realized there was no communication between the VMs. This was a result of not selecting the VLAN-based independent network  as I chose “one connected network”. I went back to each VM and removed the network adapter/logical network. I then tried to delete the logical network and was presented with this error.

Error

Within the SCVMM Fabric and right-clicking the Logical Network in question and viewing its Dependent Resources, I was able to view that there were numerous “Temporary Templates” still associated to the Logical Network. Since time was not of the essence, I could not wait for SQL and/or SCVMM to flush the data on its own time/interval. So, therefore I forcefully removed the dependencies. Here is how:

As mentioned, if you right-click on the Logical Network and view its Dependent Resources, you will get something similar to this. Take note of the name of the string.

List of Dep Resources

Now, launch the SCVMM PowerShell Console (Run as Administrator), and run the following cmdlet, “Remove-SCVMTemplate -VMTemplate “<templateID>“.

PSCode

If the template ID was inputted correctly, you should have got the following output:

PSResult

You will need to repeat this cmdlet for all of the dependent template IDs.

 

Hope that helps!

SCCM 2012 R2 (Configuration Manager) – Setup is unable to connect to SQL Server

Chances are you have a named instance for your SCCM SQL install, which is definitely the way to go. However, when installing SCCM 2012 (R2) you are presented with the following error.

Setup is unable to connect to SQL Server with the connection information provided. Verify the following:

  • The SQL Server and instance names are entered correctly
  • The specified SQL Server instance is not configured to use dynamic ports
  • If a firewall is enabled on the SQL Server, inbound rules exist to allow connections to the correct ports
  • The account used to run Setup has permissions to connect to the specified SQL server instance

1

 

To resolve this is pretty pain-less.

In my scenario, I implemented the following two solutions:

  1. Enable Named Pipes for your SQL Server Network Configuration
  2. Delete all Dynamic (TCP/IP) Ports within the Protocols for your SQL Named Instance

First, to Enable Named Pipes, Launch SQL Server Configuration Manager, expand the SQL Server Network Configuration. Locate your named instance, right-click on TCP/IP and enable.

2

Second, within the same console view, double-click and open the TCP/IP properties.

  • Here you need to delete any 0‘s (Zero’s) assigned to the TCP Dynamic Ports (Yes, remove for all IPv4, IPv6, IPAll, etc.).
  • Also within the IPAll there will be a random port assigned here (TCP Dynamic Ports), go ahead and delete this too.
  • Lastly, now you need to assign some port (ensure this port is open between your SCCM server and SCCM SQL server, if you are making use of the Windows or any Firewall(s)). In my case, I decided to assign port 1433. Within each interface, IPv4, IPv6, etc. apply your port here within the TCP Port. (See below)

2b

 

Once you have implemented the two solutions above, now go ahead and restart the SQL Server (instance name) service.

3

Now proceed with your SCCM 2012 R2 Install.

If you want to learn more on Configuring SQL Server and TCP Port(s), please see the following Microsoft article, HERE.

Cheers!

Creating Easy Tier (Multi-tier) Pool with IBM Storwize

Creating an Easy Tier (aka Multi-tier) pool within IBM’s Storwize is pretty simple, just it cannot be done via its GUI. The GUI definitely lacks this functionality, and thus I had to resort to learning some IBM CLI for the Storwize(V5000). I have been told (from IBM) the command(s) are the same for both the Storwize v7000 and v3700 series as well.

The benefits of IBM’s Easy Tier is rather impressive, and I am sure (please correct me if I am wrong) this exists within other SAN vendors as well. In my pool, there are three types of disk drives, SSD and SAS (both enterprise grade and nearline). The benefits of the multi-tiered (easy tier) pool allows data to be (seamlessly) migrated to higher-IO drives/pools that provide higher performance, ie. SSD pools.

In my case this is great, as I will have heavy-hitting IOPS SQL virtual machines that will probably require the higher performing SAS if not SSD drives. And whereas low-IOPS hitting data such as Quorums on nearline drives.

As IBM states, “Easy Tier can automatically migrate data at the sub-LUN/sub-volume level to the most appropriate storage tier. This includes the ability to automatically and non-disruptively relocate logical volume extents with high activity to storage media with higher performance characteristics, while extents with low activity are migrated to storage media with lower performance characteristics.

So how is this all done?

I am going to assume you have already created your mdisk/RAID groups. In my case my SSD drives are a RAID-5 likewise with my SAS (enterprise) drives. RAID-6 for my SAS nearline drives.

Within the CLI, you will need to get the IDs of all your drives, you can do this by running the following command, “lsdrive“. Now you can see all your drives, and their disk types, IDs, etc.

1

Now you need to create your Easy Tier pool with the mkarray command. (More syntax info can be found HERE)

“mkarray -level <raidType> -drive <IDrangeOfDrivesPerDiskTypeGroupSepeartedByColon(s)> <YourPoolName>”

mkarray -level raid5 -drive 0:1:2:3 EasyTier-Pool
*Do not forget to leave 1 drive behind as a spare within your MDisk pool, otherwise you will have no hot-spare, and will have to rebuild*
4 5

Once you have created your pool, and assoicated all the drives to the Easy Tier pool, you can now see all the mdiskX groups, using the lsmdisk command.

2

For more details, use the lsmdiskgrp command.

3

We can now also confirm the Easy Tier pool within the GUI.

image004

Now we can start building/migrating or whatever it is your SAN was designed for! 🙂

 

For more literature on IBM’s Easy Tier, please visit the LINK.

Load Balancing SCOM Agents

So you have multiple SCOM Management Servers, yet you just happen to have all of your SCOM agents reporting to one server, or maybe two if you half tried to load balance your agents. There are several reasons why you would want to have multiple Management Servers, ie. off-load workflows, reduce stress on servers, etc., etc. Well what is the point of having multiple Management Servers yet nearly all of your agents are reporting to one, or maybe two at best Management Servers, while the others are collecting dust. Load balance those agents! You could manually move an agent by right clicking and moving to a new server, or you could let our friend PowerShell automate this for you.

In my experience I have seen many SCOM environments where load balancing is either done manually, or not done at all. And usually manually implies the SCOM administrator takes a look which of the servers has the least agents, and deploys away. That works, but why not deploy to any server then let PowerShell load balance for you.

In the solution below, I am using PowerShell along with Orchestrator 2012R2. The runbook can be setup to run ad-hoc, or run regularly, ie. monthly, weekly, etc. Of course if you do not Orchestrator deployed in your environment, you could very well take the script and schedule it to run via Windows Scheduled tasks.

ce63742c-85d7-402e-b114-c3979b7ce32b

Here I have created a Runbook to execute the script, and then send back a warning notification if the Runbook failed, or an informational notification that the Runbook executed successfully.

See below for the PowerShell script. Please note, you will need to change the Line 5 with a SCOM Management server applicable to your environment, duh. This script can also be modified, and you can load balance between two gateway servers.

The script can be found HERE!

Happy SCOM’ing!

Pesky UNIX/Linux SCOM Agents (Gray State) – RETURN CODE: 1

This is a post I was meant to post quite some time ago, but forgot. Nevertheless…

If you have administrated a SCOM environment with both Wintel and UNIX/Linux machines, I am betting you have experienced some gray agents, specifically for UNIX/Linux machines.

The issue was, the server was definitely online, however according the SCOM, the server was offline or at least in a gray state. Below are the steps below I took resolve the gray agent for the machine, the server was Red Hat (RHEL) 6.x.


Steps to diagnose the issue:

  1. Could I ping the server from any of the SCOM management servers? Yes.
  2. Could I ping the server from its resource pool? Yes.
  3. Was there communication between ports 22 and 1270? Yes.
  4. Was I able to establish a Putty session via port 22? Yes.
  5. Was the SCOM process running on the server? Hmm, that’s a funny error…

1


Next are the steps I took to resolve the issue:

  1. Restart SCOM process, “sxcadmin” … Cannot, “RETURN CODE: 1”
  2. Googling, many members in the community have also had this error, and have isolated the issue to a corrupted CIM.Socket and SCX-CMID.PID file(s).
  3. Delete the files:

2

4. Let’s restart the SCX Agent…

3

5. Well that did not work either, check to see if port 1270 is evening listening…

4

6. Okay, let’s kill all processes associated scxadmin service…

5

7. Now let’s start the scxadmin process, and check again to see if port 1270 is listening…

6

8. Perfect! And what does SCOM say?

7

 

Problem solved! There are ways to automate this process, and this was achieved with the use of SCORCH and Runbooks. I will post that solution soon. Stay tuned.

 

Happy SCOM’ing! =)

(more…)