Category: Linux

Azure Update Management – Part II

A little while ago, I blogged on OMS’ (Operations Management Suite) Update Management Solution. As great as this solution was, there were some limitations at the time, such having the ability to exclude specific patches, co-management with SCCM (Configuration Manager), and few others.

Since that post, there have been some great improvements to Update Management, so let’s go over some of the key updates, and do a quick setup walk-through:

  1. Both Windows (2008R2+) and (most) Linux Operating Systems are supported
  2. Can patch any machine in any cloud, Azure, AWS, Google, etc.
  3. Can patch any machine on-premises
  4. Ability to Exclude patches

One of the biggest improvements I want to highlight is, the ability to EXCLUDE patches, perhaps in time there will also be INCLUDE only patches. 😉

First, we need to get into our Azure VM properties.. Scroll down to the Update Management.

  • If the machine belongs to a Log Analytics workspace, and/or does not have an Automation Account, then link it now, and/or link/create the Automation Account
  • If you do not have an Log Analytics workspace and/or an Automation Account, then you have the ability to create it at run-time now.

In this scenario, I kept it clean as possible, so both the Log Analytics workspace needs to be created, and likewise for the Automation Account, and Update Management needs to be linked to the workspace.

Once enabled, it a few minutes to complete the solution deployment….

After Update Management has been enabled, and it has run its discovery on the VM, insights will be populated, like its compliance state.

Now we know this machine is not compliant, as it missing a security update(s), in addition, missing 3 other updates too. Next, we will schedule a patching deployment for the future. So let’s do that now.

Now we can create a deployment schedule with some base settings, name, time, etc. But one thing to note, we can now EXCLUDE specific patches! This is a great feature, as let’s say, we are patching an application server, and a specific version of .NET will break our application, as the application Dev team has not tested the application against the latest .NET framework.

In this demo, I am going to EXCLUDE patch, KB890830.

Next, we need to create a schedule. This can be an ad-hoc schedule, or a recurring schedule.

Once you hit create, we can now see the Deployment Schedule, under Scheduled Update Deployments.

You can also click on the deployment to see it’s properties, and which patches have been excluded.

After the deployment has initiated, you can take a look at its progress.

If we go into the Update Deployment (yes, I got impatient, and deleted the first one, and re-created it…), and click on the Deployment we created, we can see the details.

As you can see, patch, KB890830 was not applied! Awesome.

If we not go back to the Update Management module, we can now see the VM is compliant.

 

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Hyper-V 2016 Linux Ubuntu PXE Network Boot Error

If you’re like me, you want to run Linux on your Hyper-V 2016 host, in my case I am attempting to run a Linux Ubuntu 16.04.1. Booting from an ISO, I kept getting the same error over and over. “PXE Network Boot using IPv4 ( ESC to cancel ) Performing DHCP Negotiation….“. After realizing it wasn’t the ISO media. It wasn’t the size of the VHDX. It wasn’t the memory/vCPU or vNIC configuration. It wasn’t even due to the fact it was a Generation 1 or Generation 2 VM…. It was Secure Boot function.

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Solution

  1. Stop the VM
  2. Go to its Settings
  3. Within Hardware > Select Security > Disable/UncheckEnable Secure Boot” > Start your machine back up!

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Yay!

How to deploy OMS Agent on Linux

There are multiple ways how to deploy the OMS agent on your Linux server. In my post,  I am going to make use of GitHub and do a quick install on a Linux server.

In my environment, I am deploying the OMS Linux (Preview) agent (version 1.1.0-124) on a 64-bit Ubuntu server, version 14.04.4. Your Ubuntu server will of course need an Internet connection (directly or via Proxy). At the time of this post, the following Linux Operating systems are currently supported, and I am deploying the Linux agent version 1.1.0-124.

*image/source, Technet.Microsoft.com

Let’s get started…

Copy and save your OMS Workspace ID and Primary Key, as your OMS agent will need these to authenticate against. These can be found within your OMS Settings > Connected Sources:

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Within your Ubuntu shell/terminal, you will need to execute the following three commands in order to download and install the OMS Agent. First we will download the latest OMS Agent from GitHub.

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  • Followed by,
    • sha256sum ./omsagent-1.1.0-124.universal.x64.sh

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  • Finally,
    • sudo sh ./omsagent-1.1.0-124.universal.x64.sh –upgrade -w <WORKSPACE ID> -s <WORKSPACE PRIMARY KEY>

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If all goes well, you should now have an added server to your Connected Sources. Yay!

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Very quickly, I can see my Ubuntu server is already transmitting data to OMS.

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Like Windows servers, we can now start collecting data from the Syslog, collecting performance metrics in Near Real Time, and if your Linux box is deployed with Nagios and/or Zabbix, we can link this data into OMS too!

For additional information on configuring Linux Performance Counters, please visit the following page, HERE.

Lastly, don’t forget to add some important syslog OMS Data Log Collection, here is what I have configured:

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Cheers!