Step-by-Step: Setup and Configure Azure Site Recovery (ASR) with Windows Server 2016 Hyper-V using ARM

Not too long ago, Microsoft announced the support of Windows 2016 and Azure Site Recovery (ASR). Microsoft’s announcement can be found HERE.

With that said, I decided to setup ASR with my Hyper-V 2016 environment. Rather than the typical blog posts (screenshots etc.,) I decided to create a step-by-step video that demonstrates how to setup ASR with Windows Server 2016 and Hyper-V. That video can be found HERE at Channel 9.

In addition this post is a series of blog posts for Azure Site Recovery (ASR).

Installing SQL 2016 for System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) 2016 – Step-by-Step

The following is a guide on how to install SQL 2016 for your System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) 2016 environment. I will be installing SQL 2016 on a brand-new server with Windows Server 2016 installed.


To begin, I am going to set the following accounts as a Local Administrator on the server. Also, I am going to be creating two SQL instances, one for the Operations database, and the other for the Data Warehouse. Since this is for my personal lab, I am not dedicated storage/drives for the databases.

 

Domain\Account Description
domain\SCOM_AA SCOM Action Account
domain\SCOM_DA SCOM Data Access/SDK Account
domain\SCOM_SQL_READ SCOM SQL Reader
domain\SCOM_SQL_WRITE SCOM SQL Writer
domain\SQL_SA SQL Service Account

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Next, let’s run the setup wizard as the SQL_SA account to make life easier down the road…

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First thing I noticed, between SQL 2012/2014 and SQL 2016, a few changes/features have been removed/added. One that stands out is, the SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) console is no longer here. Hmm.. I guess we can always connect to the databases from a console on another server/PC.

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As mentioned, I am dedicated an instance for the Operations DB, and one for the Date Warehouse DB.

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Setting the  SQL Server Agent to Automatic, and specifying the service accounts for the two services.

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Keeping the database engine collation as default, “SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS“.

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Here, I am adding all the SCOM/SQL service accounts and SQL service accounts as SQL server administrators.

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Nice! This is new for SQL 2016 — being able to create TempDB‘s. Since my VM has 8 vCPU’s, looks like SQL 2016 picked up on that, and has decided to create a one-to-one relationship. Great, let’s get started within the installation…

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Perfect! No errors. Keep in mind, we will need to repeat these steps to create the Data Warehouse instance.

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Great! Now we can go ahead with the SCOM 2016 installation! See HERE, for that post.

If you need to install the SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS), continue reading…

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Monitoring Windows Server 2016 Nano Server with SCOM 2016

The following post is intended to demonstrate how to monitor your Windows Server 2016 — Nano Server, via System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) 2016.

Also, a quick note, the SCOM team released the Windows Server 2016 Operating System Management Pack today, see HERE for the download/MP. One of the many updates to this MP (version 10.0.8.0) is the added compatibility of the Nano agent! So without further ado, let’s try installing the SCOM 2016 agent on a Nano server!

mp

To begin, I have an out-of-the-box Windows 2016 (No UI) VM. I gave it 1GB of memory, and 2 vCPU’s.

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Once the VM is online, first things first, we need to add this machine to our domain, unless you want to go the DMZ/Certificates route…. For simplicity, I am adding the Nano server to my domain, same domain as the SCOM Management Server(s) — The Nano Server and SCOM Management Server MUST be on the same domain. Same network space, etc. etc.

Assuming the above is completed, let’s begin with assigning a static IP address to the server. However, before we do this, we need to get the name of the Network Adapter(s).

Network Adapter Information

Get-NetAdapter
Get-NetIPConfiguration

These cmdlets will give us the network adapter name and current settings. As you can see below, the domain controller/DHCP has already given our server a dynamic IP (10.10.10.50). We want to change this….

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Assign Static IP

New-NetIPAddress -InterfaceIndex 2 -IPAddress 10.10.10.37 -PrefixLength 24 -DefaultGateway 10.10.10.1

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By default, the -PrefixLength 24, will assign the subnet mask of 255.255.255.0.

Next, since this is Active Directory, we want to assign the DNS Server(s) to our Network Adapter.

Assign DNS Server(s)

Set-DnsClientServerAddress -InterfaceIndex 2 -ServerAddresses 10.10.10.30, 10.10.10.31

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If you only have one DNS/DC server, then remove the second entry.

Now that we have communication with the domain controllers, now we can add our machine to the domain.

First, let’s change the server name from its random default, to something we like. I am going to go with “NANO01“.

Change Server Name

Rename-Computer -NewName "NANO01" -Restart

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Next, we can now add the server to the domain.

Add Server to Domain

Add-Computer -DomainName "RaviLocal.com" -Restart

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To quickly verify our server has been added to AD, we can take a looking at the AD Users and Computers UI:

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Great, there it is! Now we can go ahead and deploy our Microsoft Monitoring Agent (MMA)/SCOM Agent.

Deploy SCOM 2016 Agent

Since I am taking the lazy approach, I will be deploying the agent via SCOM console. If you want to make use of PowerShell, see Microsoft’s TechNet article HERE.

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Great, MMA deployed as expected! Quickly verify it is now communicating with SCOM:

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All good!

 

Happy SCOM’ing 2016!

Step-by-Step: Setup and Configure Azure Site Recovery (ASR) for On-Premises Hyper-V Host with Azure Resource Manager (ARM)

This post is a series of blog posts for Azure Site Recovery (ASR).

Here is a step by step walk-through on how to go about setting up and configuring ASR (Azure Site Recovery) and backing up your On-Premises Virtual Machines (VMs) with Azure Resource Manager (ARM).

First things, first, Azure’s Recovery Service Vault is a unified vault/resource that allows you to manage your backup and data disaster recovery needs within Azure. For example, if you are hosting your VMs on-premises you can create a link between your on-prem site and Azure to allow your VMs to be backed-up into Azure. This is regardless of your hypervisor, it can be either ESX or Hyper-V, either will work. However for the interest of this blog post, I will be setting up ASR for a Hyper-V 2012R2 host.



Configuring Azure

Step 1: Create a Recovery Services Vault

Within Azure Resource Manager (ARM), if we select New, within the Marketplace, select Monitoring + management, then select Backup and Site Recovery (OMS) within the featured apps. Of course if this is no longer present, just search for it within the marketplace.

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Next we will now need to create our vault.

Give it a meaningful name, and you can either create a new Resource Group, or use an existing. I opted with existing, as I will (another post) next setup a Site-to-Site ASR.

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Give this a few seconds, maybe minutes to do its thing…

Great, now our Vault is up and ready to go!

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Step 2: Choose your Protection Goal(s)

Click Settings > Site Recovery (Under Getting Stated) > Step 1: Prepare Infrastructure > Protection Goal > And specify the following > Click OK:

  • Replicating to: Azure
  • Machines Virtualized: Yes, with Hyper-V
  • Using SCVMM (Virtual Machine Manager): No

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Step 3: Setup the Source Environment

Next, we will now need to Prepare our source give our Hyper-V site a name, “Ravi-OnPrem” makes sense here, but give it something meaningful.

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Now we need to download the ASR Provider Installer, along with the Vault Registration Key.

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Step 4:  Install and Configure the ASR Provider on Hyper-V Host

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This Hyper-V host is not behind any Proxy…

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If we go back to Azure, we can now see our Hyper-V host populated.

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Step 5: Create a Replication Policy

Within our Vault properties > Settings > Manage: Site Recovery Infrastructure > For Hyper-V Sites: Replication Policies > +Replication Policies

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Step 6: Associate Hyper-V Site(s)

Next we will need to Associate our Hyper-V site:

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Great! Now we can continue on with Step 3 (Target Environment) of Step 1 (Preparing Infrastructure).

Step 7: Create a Storage Account + Virtual Network

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Within the Replication, we have a few options here. I left mine as default (GRS) Geo-Redundant.

Next, we need to create a Target Virtual Network:

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Now we can go ahead and setup the replication settings:

Step 8: Setup Replication Settings

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Since we create the Replication Policy beforehand, this auto-filled. Next we need to do some Capacity Planning. Since this is simply a walk-through example, I elected to skip this, but for a real-production environment, I would highly recommend doing this.

Here is a link to Microsoft’s Capacity Planner for Hyper-V Replica.

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Hit OK, and now we are ready to to move on to Step 2 (Replication Application)

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This all should have populated since we created our Storage account and Virtual Network just earlier… If not, add them.

Now Azure should have connected with our Hyper-V host, we can now see our VMs within our Hyper-V host. Here we now need to select which machines we will want to include within ASR. For simplicity and variety, I am going to select a domain controller and a Linux machine.

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Now we need to configure the VMs properties:

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Once we are good, we can go ahead and apply the Replication Policy to our VMs.

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Once satisfied, go ahead and hit “Enable Replication“.

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Lastly, Step 3, we now need to complete creating our Recovery Plan:

Step 9: Create Recovery Plan

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Great! All done? Before we say all done, let’s go back to our Hyper-V host, and configure the Network/Throttling bandwidth.

Step 10: Network/Throttle Bandwidth

My Hyper-V host is not equipped with a GUI as I am using Windows 2012R2 Minimal Server, so navigate here to launch the Microsoft Azure Backup Agent, “C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Recovery Services Agent\bin\“. Launch, “wabadmin“.

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In the Actions pane, select “Change Properties” >> Select the Throttling tab.

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Change these settings as to your needs. I wanted to increase my non-work hours to 4MB, but looks like 1MB is the max.

Great! Since we already hit, enable replication, this process should have already started… Let’s go back to Azure:

If we take a look at the Vault > Settings > Protected Items > Replicated Items 

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Once these VMs are 100% Synchronized, the next steps will be to simulate a fail over, both Test and Planned.

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